Interview with debut author Carrie Nichols!

Today I’m speaking with Carrie Nichols, debut author of The Marine’s Secret Daughter, a romance about forgiveness and second chances. Carrie’s book is published by Harlequin and will be out SOON, the paperback will be available 1/16/18 and the digital on 2/1/18.

I’ve asked Carrie to talk about her writing process, but first, here is a peek at the cover:

The Marine's Secret Daughter

Carrie’s book isn’t out yet, but you can grab a copy early if you just click on THIS!

And how about a quick teaser….

This was not how her first meeting in over five years with Riley Cooper was supposed to happen. In her imagination, she was all sexy in a little black dress and killer heels after a relaxing spa day. Yeah, right; she’d spent the day cleaning and probably looked like Nick Nolte’s mug shot. So not fair! Riley was supposed to be breathless and falling at her feet, not vice versa. Stupid, stupid asthma.

Minerva Spencer: Thanks for joining me, Carrie. My first question is one authors get all the time: How long did you take to write your book?

Carrie Nichols: Years and years. LOL! The story underwent a lot of changes since I knew nothing about plotting and story arcs when I first wrote it as a series of scenes. But these characters wouldn’t let go and I’d learned enough by the 4th draft to start winning contests and to sign with my dream agent.

MS: What kind of research did you do for this book?

CN:  I love research so I did way more than I needed. I researched the fictional setting of Loon Lake, Vermont, including the loons that make the lake home. I consulted several nurse friends for the hospital scenes, a friend whose son was a marine and my critique partner whose husband is a respiratory therapist.

MS: Did you have to change much during the editing process?

CN:  We mostly added things during the editing process. I had already removed scenes that didn’t further the story thanks to my ever patient agent.

MS: Are you a plotter or a pantser?

CN:  I’m a recovering pantser. I had the luxury of years to write and rewrite my first story but knew I had to learn plotting basics to sell on proposal. I still struggle with plotting but with the help of Laura Baker’s Turning Points and Discovering Story Magic online classes, I’m slowly becoming a plotster. I have a skeleton with the big scenes and story/character arcs and fill in the rest as I write.

MS:  What is your favorite part of your writing process, and why?

CN:  Getting to know my characters and what makes them tick. They come to me fully formed and I have to figure out what happened to them (their backstory) to turn them into the flawed people they are. And because I write romance, I love giving them their HEA (happily ever after) after making them work for it.

MS:  Can you share your writing routine?

CN:  I write in my home office. When my youngest moved out I cried when I walked into his empty room until I realized I had an empty room! As my husband observed, I wasted no time in making that room my own with paint and some bookcases. I am also lucky enough to not have a day job. I lost my job about a month after signing the contract with Harlequin and since my husband was already retired, I decided to join him.

MS: One last question. If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

CN: Don’t give up!!

Carrie Nichols

Carrie Nichols, is a hardy New Englander transplanted to the deep South, where two inches of snow can bring a city like Atlanta to its knees. She loves to travel, is addicted to British crime dramas and knows a Seinfeld quote appropriate for every occasion. 
Carrie has one tolerant husband, two grown sons and two critical cats. To her dismay, Carrie’s characters, much like her family, often ignore the wisdom and guidance she lovingly offers.


USA Today called Carrie’s short story, Snowbound with the Stork, “a charming debut”

You can connect with Carrie at:

Website: http://carrienichols.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authorCarrieNichols/

Twitter: @carolopal

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/carolopal/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15104405.Carrie_Nichols

Meet Pamela Kopfler, author of the new cozy mystery, Better Dead.

Earlier this week fellow @authors18 author and blogger Dianne Freeman talked with Pamela Kopfler about her debut novel, Better Dead. Today I’m going to ask Pamela questions on one of my favorite topics: a writer’s creative process.

First, here is a brief description of the book:

Pamela Kopfler

A feisty B & B owner believes her cheatin’ husband deserves to choke on his divorce papers and spend eternity roasting in hell after nearly bankrupting her Louisiana bed and breakfast. At least, she’s half-right when he turns up dead, but she’s dead wrong when she accidentally calls him back from the grave. Unfortunately, he has unfinished business. Unless she wants to be stuck with her ghostly ex forever, she has to wedge him through the pearly gates by cleaning up the mess he left behind—a smuggling ring he started behind her back at her B&B. Now she has thirty days to solve her not-so-dearly-departed’s murder or she’s stuck with him for life. Or worse, she may be doing life.

Amazon   B & N   BAM

 

Minerva Spencer: How long did you take to write this book? 

Pamela Kopfler: It took seventy-eight days to draft Better Dead. The revision took much longer, but I don’t remember how long. Revision is something that is never really complete.

MS: What kind of research did you do for this book?

PK: Oh, it was grueling…I visited many historic homes that had been converted to beautiful bed and breakfasts, sipped lots of cocktails, and ate some of the best southern style food on earth. Don’t pity me too much though. (Excuse me while I bless my own heart before you do.) Actually, that part of the research was serious fun! Other than that fun B & B research, my family has orders to bleach bit my computer to hide my search history.

MS:  What did you remove from this book during the editing process?

PK:  I cut ten thousand words. I had a subplot that my editor felt needed to go and she was right. I hope to add some snips from the editing room floor to my newsletter. I really did cut my darlings.


MS:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

PK:  Both. I have a general idea of the whole story and an opening when I put my keys on the keyboard. After I get the opening down, I write a short synopsis just for me. As the pages pile up, sometimes the plot changes because I’ve found a better twist, so I go with that.


MS:  What is your favorite part of your writing process, and why?

PK:  Revising. It’s like makeup. Everyone looks better with a little lipstick on.


MS: And finally, what is the most challenging part of your writing process, and why?

PK:  Starting, hands down. Once I am writing the real world fades away, and I’m in a timeless place where the story comes to life.

Thanks for sharing your writing process with me, Pamela, and congrats on your debut!

If you’re a fan of cozy mysteries or looking to try one you can connect with Pamela on her website, or find her on Facebook,  Twitter, or Instagram

Book Review of Never Dare a Wicked Earl by Renee Ann Miller

Never Dare a Wicked Earl (Infamous Lords, #1)Never Dare a Wicked Earl by Renee Ann Miller

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is a great way to kick off a holiday in a good mood!

I loved Hayden and Sophia (and also Lady Olivia) and their romance was fraught with enough delicious tension to keep me flicking the pages on my Kindle like a junkie.

The part of Miller’s writing that impressed me the most (okay, there are 2 parts) was her ability to evoke the era (or certainly what felt like a “bygone” era, to me) and also her delightful turn of phrase (GREAT similes which made me alternately smile or move to the edge of my seat). Miller does an excellent job of injecting historical fact into the story without beating the reader over the head with it.

Great sensuality and tension throughout, with lots of secondary characters to bring depth to the story and make you care what happened to the H&h.

The author also did a fantastic job engaging my sense of smell, something I don’t often experience reading books. From the seamier smells of London’s impoverished back alleys to a gourmet breakfast that made me get out of bed and ransack the kitchen at 10 o’clock at night.

This book is a Victorian adventure that will engage and satisfy all your senses.

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Match Made in Manhattan by Amanda Stauffer

Match Made in ManhattanMatch Made in Manhattan by Amanda Stauffer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Match Made in Manhattan (MMM from now on) took me on a journey down “Memory Lane” and back into my own past.

I kicked off my dating years back in the ’80s, when there were no cell phones (horrors!) and people were pretty much out of control when it came to sex, drinking (drive-in liquor stores!) and drugs.

The story Stauffer tells in her book could hardly be more different than what I experienced. Even so, there are definite parallels between dating in the 80s and dating in 2015 (or so), and I think that is where the magic in this book lies–the commonalities of the dating scene that bridge age or era. I swear, I dated the older brothers (or uncles) of some of Allison’s duds….

Anyhow, here’s the story: Allison–our protag– isn’t out for a good time and NSA sex; she is looking for a mate. But although she has a “The Pants Stay On” approach to dating, Allison doesn’t come off as a prude or judgmental, instead she is mature, focused, and decisive about what she wants in a guy.  I mean she is VERY mature and focused and I found her approach to dating fascinating to read about as it is so utterly different than my own.

Interspersed between her various dates are interesting details about her job, which is certainly a conversation starter: she is an architectural conservator. Her job (well, her boss) and the attendant stresses are a big part of the story, and the reader gets more than just a series of amusing dating vignettes–they get a thoughtfully crafted tale of her life and who she is.

I think the comps on the book blurb may do this book a disservice. I’ve never seen the reality TV show The Bachelor so I can’t say whether that is accurate, but I have read TBJ Diaries and I would say MMM is a more serious “slice of life” with humorous moments and incidents. Unlike Bridget Jones, Allison is not a drinking, smoking, weight-obsessed woman consumed with finding a man and I respect the way she conducts her friendships, career, and relationships.

While she maintains her standards throughout the book I did enjoy her changing attitude and approach to dating and her dates as the bloom slowly comes off the rose (don’t want to spoil the ending, which is not what I expected…)

NYC is one of my favorite cities and Stauffer works the City into the story almost like another character. At times the role NYC played made me think of another story about single women and their different approaches to men/life/love/careers in NYC. (Go ahead, guess!)

I found myself turning pages late into the night, eagerly reading about each date and wondering where it would go. Rooting for some of the guys, shaking my head in disbelief at others (my favorite out of all the dates was Brandon. What the hell was THAT all about?!)

Anyhow, I hugely enjoyed my journey into Allison’s life, which made me think back on things in my own life I haven’t thought about for years.

A fun page-turner and great debut.

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The Ghosts of Galway, Ken Bruen

The Ghosts of GalwayThe Ghosts of Galway by Ken Bruen

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I am a huge Bruen fan and have read everything he has written. This is his 13th Jack Taylor book and it as engaging as everything else in his oeuvre. You could read this as a stand-alone, but the series really does fit together in such a way as to make starting from the beginning more rewarding.

Bruen’s books are dark and edgy and this one is more so than most–if you’ve been reading this series, you will know that is saying something…

The book is full of observations on everything, from the meaning of life to current affairs. Watching Jack destroy himself is never easy, but it is always an exciting ride.

I love so many things about this book, but do wish–as I always do with Mr. Bruen–that his books were a bit longer. Still, I guess it is natural to want more of a great thing.

I will continue to read and buy Bruen’s books as long as he continues to put them out. There is nobody who writes dialogue that is as sharp, witty, and abrasive. I love it and give The Ghosts of Galway an enthusiastic 2 thumbs up.

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Interview with Sandi Ward, author of THE ASTONISHING THING

Today I’m interviewing fellow Kensington author Sandi Ward, who has joined me to talk about her new book.

Hi Sandi! I understand the narrator of The Astonishing Thing is somewhat. . . unusual. Can you tell me about it?

The narrator of this story is a cat! Her name is Boo. I decided to write a story from a cat’s point of view as she tries to solve a mystery. In this case, Boo’s human mother goes out one day and doesn’t return. Boo wants to know: what happened to my mother?

As I wrote more of the story, I realized that Boo’s point-of-view was similar to that of a perceptive child. She understands a lot of what’s going on with her humans—but not everything. Boo doesn’t know much about mental illness, or divorce, or what exactly is wrong with the baby of the family. So the reader must go on a journey with Boo, piecing together clues until the truth becomes clear.

I have to ask: Is there romance in your novel?

Absolutely! Although my story is general fiction and I write about families, I love stories with romance. I have never written a story that didn’t include a romantic relationship at its’ core.

To my narrator, Boo, the need to find a mate is completely normal and natural. At the same time, Boo finds the mating rituals of humans very amusing. She thinks people are funny and quirky, and she can’t always figure out what people are attracted to, and why.

In her family, Boo also gets to see up close what devotion truly is about: sacrifice, the willingness to look the other way sometimes, and forgiveness. And even then, no one is guaranteed a happy-ever-after. In real life, sometimes “happy for now” is good enough.

Here is Boo on the cover of Sandi’s book:

the astonishing thing copy_March 2017.jpg

Why did you name the cat Boo?

First of all, I just think it’s a very cute name for a cat. It’s simple and sweet.

I also had in mind Boo Radley from To Kill A Mockingbird. He’s another character who is housebound and very quiet, but impacts a story at important moments.

The humans in the story have other nicknames for Boo, like Cutie and Sweetie. Because I’m a J.K. Rowling fan, the character Jimmy (a teenager) also sometimes calls the cat  “Crookshanks”. Boo doesn’t get the reference, of course. She has no idea who Harry Potter is, and couldn’t care less.

ABOUT THE ASTONISHING THING:

In her inventive, sometimes bittersweet, ultimately uplifting debut, Sandi Ward draws readers into one extraordinary cat’s quest to make sense of her world, illuminating the limits and mysterious depths of love . . .

Pet owners know that a cat’s loyalty is not easily earned. Boo, a resourceful young feline with a keen eye and inquiring mind, has nonetheless grown intensely devoted to her human companion, Carrie. Several days ago, Carrie—or Mother, as Boo calls her—suddenly went away, leaving her family, including Boo, in disarray. Carrie’s husband, Tommy, is distant and distracted even as he does his best to care for Boo’s human siblings, especially baby Finn.

Boo worries about who will fill her food dish, and provide a warm lap to nestle into. More pressing still, she’s trying to uncover the complicated truth about why Carrie left. Though frequently mystified by human behavior, Boo is sure that Carrie once cared passionately for Tommy and adores her children, even the non-feline ones. But she also sees it may not be enough to make things right. Perhaps only a cat—a wise, observant, very determined cat—can do that . . .

Wonderfully tender and insightful, THE ASTONISHING THING explores the intricacies of marriage and family through an unforgettable perspective at the center of it all.

“A unique and poignant tale of a family’s struggle as witnessed by someone who sees everything…a triumphant debut for Sandi Ward.”

— Helen Brown, New York Times bestselling author of Cleo

FIND THE ASTONISHING THING AT YOUR LOCAL BOOKSELLER, OR:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

ABOUT SANDI

Sandi Ward grew up in Manchester-By-The-Sea, Massachusetts. She attended Tufts University, and received her MA in Creative Writing at New York University, where she studied with E.L. Doctorow. She now lives on the Jersey Shore with her husband, teenagers, dog and a big black cat named Winnie. Sandi is a medical writer at an ad agency in New Jersey, specializing in psychiatry and pain management.

Her first novel for Kensington Books is titled THE ASTONISHING THING, and it is available October 31, 2017. Her second novel is titled SOMETHING WORTH SAVING, available November 2018.

To learn more about Sandi and STAY IN TOUCH:

Learn more at: www.sandiwardbooks.com

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Book Review: The Typewriter’s Tale

The Typewriter's TaleThe Typewriter’s Tale by Michiel Heyns

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

 

*I loved this book. I’ve read my share of James, but it was years and years ago. When I started reading this book the first thing I had to do was sloooooow the heck down. This is a novel to be savored, like rich chocolate. The writing is luxurious and when you relax into it you feel transported to a different, more dignified, time. Not that people weren’t as manipulative and nasty as ever, but just better dressed and more well-spoken while going about it. . .

I was also thrilled to see my old friends, adverbs, back in such abundance. When is the last time somebody in the literary world dared to use so many adverbs? Heyns uses them fearlessly and to great effect. Each sentence is like a mini work of art and you get the impression Heyns lovingly considered the worth and meaning of every single word before it earned its place on the page.

Heyns has a wicked sense of humor and a poison pen which is very reminiscent of James and Wharton. The internal reflections of the main character, Frieda, are what really make this book great. She is at once innocent and very insightful, looking from the outside, while being slowly drawn in.

Heyns is enamored of James but is still capable of portraying him “warts and all” and I found I liked the novelist more and more as the book went on. It is sometimes easy to view the artist as self-indulgent and affected, but Heyns’s characterization is sensitive and avoids the obvious traps.

I wouldn’t say this was a beach read, but it would go well with a shady, quiet river and some chocolate.

****Possible SPOILER****
I wish the ending had been more fulfilling, but fans of James will expect an ending like this. You get the feeling Heyns is making Frieda suffer so she will have something to write about, something to push her on her way to becoming an author.

Anyhow, I really enjoyed this book and am grateful something this elegant can still find its way into a publishing house and then out again, without giving in to twenty-first expectations. Beautiful.

*My reviews are about my enjoyment of a book as a reader. I’m not a literary critic and I don’t delve deeply into the psychological motivations of the author and/or characters. If I am reviewing a book on my blog, I consider it worth reading. Books I read and don’t care for, for one reason or another, I do not review. There are plenty of other places to find negative reviews.

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DIY: Building a New Home for my Shoes

Those of you who know a bit about us know we used to operate a bed and breakfast. The one thing you have lots of when you close your b&b is space. We went from living in ONE bedroom in a 9-bedroom house to having all those rooms to ourselves. All those rooms to fill with junk! Yes, it’s a hoarder’s paradise. . .

Anyhow, back when the house was converted into a b&b all but 4 closets were changed into bathrooms. The result is a bathroom-rich, closet-poor house. My shoes were spread through the entire house, crammed in various closets. They weren’t happy.

Last year I decided to take a room we’d been using as a sitting room–which had become more of a dust-gathering room–and convert it into a dressing room. Yes, a real-live dressing room. Just like in those historical romance novels I enjoy so much. . .

I have FINALLY finished everything and taken pictures. But first, here is a little about the torturous process.

Here are a couple before pictures of the sitting room, which has its own bathroom and wet bar (yeeeeessssss, that means my dressing room has its own wet bar!!):

IMG_0080

And here is another, taken from the other direction. That arched doorway leads to our bedroom. That cow scull on the wall is genuine, certified, organic longhorn. Seriously. Unfortunately I had no wall space to accommodate it in the new Shoe Palace.

CWI 077

Once I took everything out of it (almost–see how those boxes of shoes have already sneaked in to check out their new home?) it looked like this:

IMG_0651

I knew I didn’t want California Closets closets for two reasons: one, they wouldn’t fit the character of the adobe and viga construction and two, I couldn’t afford them. I decided I wanted something more rustic and rugged, so I settled on plumbing piping, which I’d seen used in a swanky too-cool clothing shop on my last visit to Toronto.

As usual, I’m kind of lousy with photographing every step. But the process is actually pretty straight forward. Decide on the size of unit you want and measure and then buy a whole pile of metal pipes, elbows, three-ways, and flanges for connecting the unit. The only tricky part (okay, so it turns out there is a SECOND tricky part, but I’ll get to that below) is accounting for the threads on each piece to make sure you end up with what you measured. That was a bit trial and error and many harsh words were spoken by me, to myself, because I had nobody else to blame.

Anyhow, I spray painted the pieces separately and then screwed them all together and spray painted them again. In the middle of all this it rained several times. Here is a picture I took after having to hustle everything back into the house when it rained, drag it back out afterward, and spray it again:

IMG_0649

So, that’s a pretty eyeball-boggling photo, but you get the gist.

The second thing I hadn’t counted on was the irregular surface on the adobe walls and ceiling, none of which are flush or straight (part of the joy of adobe). This meant that each and every segment was a bit different and I had only measured in one place for each unit. Whoops! The good news is that plumbing pipes come in so many pieces and sizes! Yes, I just purchased a few 1/2 and 1/4 sections, spray painted and screwed those puppies on, and everything worked out just fine. The large pieces–the 4 and 5 foot hanging sections–I had cut at the lumber yard.

Here are a few pictures of experiments with different segments. You’ll notice, in the final picture, that some of the sections didn’t make the final cut. I realized that putting built-ins on small sections of wall wasn’t very economical. (For example, the picture below.) Luckily, I just propped up the pipe and used some scrap lumber for shelving to check this out before I actually screwed anything down.

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Here is the work in progress. See how tidy I am?

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And now for the fun pictures:

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Yes! A sitting area to sip cocktails or tea!

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And, finally. . . the Wall of Shoes:

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Ta-da!

 

Read a FREE excerpt of the exciting new release by Kari Lemor, Running Target

An innocent in the crossfire . . .

FBI agent Jack Holland broke every rule in the book falling for the girlfriend of Angelo Cabrini, son of a New Jersey mob boss. But even if Callie Lansing’s relationship to Angelo was actually a cover and her heart was free, her relationship with Jack put both of their lives at risk. Nothing, though, could make Jack regret the liaison that led to the birth of their son, Jonathan.

After Angelo discovered Callie’s pregnancy, he went after Jack and wound up dead. Now Jack is on the run with a target on his back. The only thing keeping Callie and Jonathan safe is the mob boss’s belief that the baby is his grandchild. But if Victor Cabrini discovers the truth before Jack can put him behind bars, it could mean death for his sweet covert family. . . .

Early praise for Running Target

“Thrilling . . . Lemor once again features a dynamite protagonist who’s easily relatable, and her talent for incorporating romance and forgiveness against the odds makes Running Target even more enticing.” —RT Book Reviews, 4 Stars

“Ms. Lemor has delivered a scintillating read in this book where the chemistry was riveting; the secondary characters entertained me just as much as the main ones; and the ending took me completely by surprise.” ~ Book Magic Book Reviews

“Running Target is about finding one’s way back home. It’s about beating the odds when it seems like everything is going against you. And most importantly, it’s about family. I would recommend this for readers who enjoy their romance mixed with a light level of suspense.” ~Harlequin Junkie

Excerpt:

An infant’s cry broke the stillness of the maternity ward as Jack crept through the hallway. He looked toward the nursery. Should he go there first or to where Callie was? The room was less risky and he needed to see her. Assure himself she was okay.

The door was ajar so he slipped through, closing it enough to allow a sliver of light to filter in. He made out the petite shape of the sleeping woman then saw the bassinet next to her. His breath left his body. The baby was here with her.

Stepping closer, he looked down on the clear container, the blue tag proclaiming this child to be a boy. Squinting in the dim light, he read the words. Mother’s name: Callina Lansing. Baby: Jonathan.

Jonathan. She’d named the baby after him. A lump clogged his throat. A son. Damn. He had a son and wouldn’t be able to get to know him, see him grow, share in his life. This fucking world was too cruel at times.

He shouldn’t take the chance but he needed to hold him. It was vital that he touch the life he and Callie had created. He wanted—no needed—to let his child know how much he loved him. The powerful emotion emanated from his heart even as he gazed down at the tiny figure. How could love grow this fast? His first glimpse was only a second ago. Now the feeling consumed him.

Reaching down, he stroked the side of his son’s face. The baby turned his head, his bow-shaped lips opening slightly. Jack’s heart beat faster. The protective instincts that had always come into play when he was around Callie, throbbed to life and expanded as he gazed at the sweet face of his son. Heat like an electric storm surged through his blood. How could he protect this child in his current situation? He’d bring more danger upon him if he hung around. Eight months of running, trying to escape the long arm of Victor Cabrini, had shown him what hell was. Now he glimpsed a small piece of heaven.

He slid his hands under the infant, lifting him from the bed to hold him close. Jonathan barely weighed anything. His heart constricted yet again. The innocent baby scent wafted into his nostrils and he blinked back the moisture filling his eyes. The reaction was primitive and territorial. This was his son.

Their child’s eyes opened but no cry erupted so Jack relaxed. It shook him to the core knowing Callie had named the baby after him. After deserting her she had every right to hate him. As much as he hated himself. Leaving her hadn’t been in his plans but the choice had been ripped away from him. It had taken a while to recover from the stabbing. Then the fuck-up by the Bureau had happened.

He stared again at the unfocused eyes of his son, his forehead touching that of the infant’s. Kissing his face, he absorbed every little facet he could. Who knew if he’d ever see him again.

Gazing at the sleeping woman, her innocent face relaxed in slumber, caused more pain to rip through his heart. Her dark hair, streaked with natural reds and golds, was a riot of curls that framed her peaceful face. Long lashes fanned over high cheekbones, highlighting the lovely structure of her eyes. His beautiful Calico Cat.

Had the pregnancy and labor been hard? She must have looked amazing, all round and filled with his child. Regret tore through him, anger warring with that emotion. Anger that his life had been stolen from him. He’d been fighting to get it back, but didn’t seem any closer now than he’d been eight months ago.

Jonathan let out a small mewing sound and Jack snuggled him close. “I’m right here, pal. I might not be around much but I wanted to let you know…I love you very much.” His voice cracked with emotion. “I’m your Dad.”

He had a son. Was now a father. But he couldn’t be a father—not in the way that it mattered. He’d swore he’d be better than his dad. But this—he’d be worse. As it began to sink in, his hands shook with the enormity of the situation.

A noise from Callie drew his eyes to the bed. She shouldn’t see him. It was too dangerous. Still he wasn’t ready to give up holding his son quite yet. You might as well rip his heart from his chest and throw it on the floor.

Buy links:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GYPLR6A/

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/running-target-kari-lemor/1125166579?ean=9781516100736

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/running-target/id1178479419?mt=11

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Kari_Lemor_Running_Target?id=zhGJDQAAQBAJ

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/running-target

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Book Review: Animal Hats

Animal Hats: 15 patterns to knit and show offAnimal Hats: 15 patterns to knit and show off by Vanessa Mooncie

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I was shocked to see I am not the only person around with an obsession for animal hats. I haven’t knitted any animal hats, but here are a few I crocheted.

 

 

I’m much more comfortable with a crochet hook than I am with knitting needles so I just made up these hats as I went along. But for a knitted hat, I knew I would need a pattern.

I am currently making the rabbit hat and plan to tackle the more difficult elephant hat if that goes well.

So far I’m impressed with the book and find the instructions very straightforward and easy to understand. I like that each pattern lists yarn weights (mostly chunky) along with specific brand names. I am using Lion brand Thick and Quick for the rabbit hat instead of the Rowan Chunky Felted Tweed the book has listed. I love Rowan yarns but at $12.95/skein (If you can find it) that would put this hat (the pattern calls for 5 skeins) at just under $65, which I’m not willing to pay.   I dropped a needle size to get the right size for my gauge swatch.

None of the patterns are rated for skill level, but it is pretty clear by looking at them how difficult or easy they will be. The dog and frog hats, for example, look easier than the elephant or rabbit or cow.

The patterns all include both child and adult sizes.

Stay tuned for pictures as I promise to actually take some during the process this time!

I was planning to make these as Christmas gifts, but I’m not sure I’ll be able to give them away…

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